Great pubs (and walks) in the UK

A good pub deserves a good walk. Or is it the other way around? A good walk deserves a good pub. Here we bring you a round up of some of the UK’s best pub-walking combinations.

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Britain’s highest pub: Located a stunning 1,732ft above sea level, The Tan Hill Inn, Swaledale, North Yorkshire, claims the title as the highest pub in Britain. It’s certainly remote although the pub does sit on two long-distance walking routes, the Pennine Way and the Coast to Coast Walk. The Tan Hill Inn also boasts a legendary spirit walker – a ghost of “Mrs Peacock”, who ran the inn for 40 years. She is said to appear whenever alterations are being made, when she oversees the work.

Britain’s most remote pub: With no roads in or out, an 18-mile hike over Scotland’s Munros or a seven-mile sea crossing takes you to the Old Forge pub. Listed in the Guinness Book of Records as the remotest pub on mainland Britain, The Old Forge, in the village of Inverie, in Knoydart, is a great place to visit (and walk). If you choose to sail to Inverie you can enjoy a wealth of walks from the pub’s doorstep. The Old Forge Pub is also listed as one of only three of “Scotland’s bloody good pubs” by Peter Irvine in his The Best Of Scotland 2011.

No road too…: Another pub that can claim to be pretty remote is the Berney Arms in Norfolk. It can only be reached by foot, boat or train as there is no road access.

Smallest pub: The Nutshell in Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, is Britain's smallest pub measuring only five metres by two metres, according to the Guinness Book of Records. In 1984, a record 102 people squeezed inside. There are plenty of walks to be enjoyed in the area before enjoying a rewarding trip to The Nutshell. (Or should the Smallest Pub title go to The Hole in the Wall, Brighton, which also claims to be the smallest pub in Britain, with a certificate stating this fact on the wall?)

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The oldest pub: This claim to fame goes to Ye Olde Trip To Jerusalem in Nottingham. Originally known as The Pilgrim, it incorporates caves under Nottingham Castle and claims to be the oldest pub in the UK with proof of its existence dating back to 1189.

Pub on the cliffs: Marsden Grotto at South Shields in Tyne and Wear claims to be the only pub in Europe that is built on a sea-cliff face and partially into sea-cliff caves. A circular walk takes in the Cleadon Hills and Marsden Grotto.

The inner circle: The Red Lion at Avebury in Wiltshire is said to be the only pub in the world to be located inside a stone circle.

Most southerly pub: The most southerly pub in the UK (on the mainland) is The Top House, Lizard, Cornwall. A wonderful Three Sides of the Lizard walk will earn you a guilt-free meal and beer reward for sure!

The most northerly pub: Situated in the wild North Atlantic, less than 200 miles from Norway and on the same latitude as southern Greenland, Unst, in  Shetland, is the most northerly populated island in the British Isles. Here you’ll find accommodation at Saxa Vord as well as the Sergeants' Mess Lounge Bar.

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Most Westerly pub: Again Scotland takes this title with the Isle Of Barra Beach Hotel. The hostelry is located 60 miles from mainland Scotland on the wildly beautiful Outer Hebridean island of Barra. Walking on fabulous white sandy beaches is the stuff of lifetime memories – and the perfect way to build an appetite for a meal and a pint.

We'd love to hear about other pubs (and walks) with great claims to fame.

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